New Media

I am excited about the panel my colleague and friend Jess and I are putting together for the 2014 annual meeting of the Society for American Music. Here’s our call for papers:

Teaching with New Media

New Media is an evolving group of online creative practices that rely upon the interplay of technology, visual arts, and sound. It is by nature dynamic and accessible, interactive and participatory, encouraging collaboration and the wide exchange of ideas. In the past decade, technological innovations such as YouTube, Facebook, Skype, and Spotify have changed the structure and pace of global society by encouraging and facilitating an interconnected world. This has had an impact on post-secondary education: on what students expect from university courses and their professors, and on the ways professors approach pedagogy. Though music is entwined in this New Media world, and though New Media promises to provide effective tools for music pedagogy, its presence in the discourse and practice of the instruction of American music is still rather limited. With all of this new and continuously developing software at our disposal and the ways it promises to benefit the learning environment, professors—and especially professors in a field as media-friendly and media-dependent as musicology—must come to terms with its possibilities.

This panel considers how to effectively incorporate New Media as a pedagogical tool in the classroom and what role it can play in the music and music history context. In what ways can we use the tools to stimulate discovery, collaboration, participatory learning, and critical thinking? What risks are inherent in the application of new and changing New Media software? How can such barriers, or should such barriers, be overcome? Through the sharing of real-world classroom applications and experiences, this panel aims to stimulate conversation about the utility of New Media in post-secondary musicological pedagogy.

Panel organizers Dr. Paula Bishop (Bridgewater State University) and Jessica Getman (University of Michigan) welcome papers that address this topic from a broad range of perspectives. Some possibilities:

    • Blogging, vlogging, and podcasting as an online, low-stakes area in which to shape ideas and practice communication.
    • Social media and multiple modes of communication.
    • Online music- and video-sharing sites and the exchange of interests as an educational tool.
    • Hands-on media projects created with easily accessible editing software.
    • Collaborative technology and musical creativity.
    • Media course facilitation via course management software.
    • Massive Open Online Classes (MOOCs) about music or musical media.
    • Flipped classrooms and activities.
    • Active learning and diverse learning styles.
    • Issues of copyright and fair use in New Media teaching strategies.
    • Personal experiences in teaching with New Media in music courses.

We have received some exciting abstracts and feel like we have a strong panel submission. Even if we are not accepted, we are going to continue to research, write, and collaborate on this topic. Check out our new blog, newmediamusicology.com.

Posted in Writing

Wherever You Go, There You Are

And sometimes you are in two places at once.

I am in the process of consolidating my old site from the Boston University server and my old blog into this site. In the process I am culling out the less-than-useful information, adding new material, and generally finding ways to avoid doing the writing I really should be doing. This will take a while so pardon my mess.

Posted in Writing